Faculty & Staff

gait team

Back Row: Jodi, Burke, Bone Front Row: Marybeth, Kathy, Victoria

Marybeth Barkocy, P.T., DPT
Marybeth Barkocy

Marybeth Barkocy
Assistant Professor

Dr. Marybeth Barkocy, an Assistant Professor is a pediatric clinical PT on the UNM Gait and Motion Analysis team working to develop the center for clinical gait analysis, research, and teaching. She received her Bachelor’s in physical therapy from UNM in 1990 and she completed part of her Masters in Organizational Learning and Instructional Technology from UNM before switching to her clinical doctorate in Physical Therapy at A.T. Still University. Dr. Barkocy has practiced physical therapy at The Children’s Hospital in Denver and in Albuquerque Public Schools. She is an experienced outpatient therapist and clinical instructor at ExplorAbilities Pediatric Therapy Center. She has taken several courses involving gait including: Level 1 and 2 courses taught by Lisa Persuade, PT, DPT, PCS, CKTP on “Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Toe Walking from PT and OT Perspectives”, Clinical Gait Analysis: A Focus on Interpretation, level 1. She also participated in hands-on training with a PT from Shriner’s Hospital to perform clinical exams and 3D gait analysis interpretation. Current research includes analyzing 3-D gait analyses in children with neuromotor disorders, toe-walking evaluation and interventions, and participation in an international study assessing functional changes in upper extremity function following Dysport Botox injections and home exercise intervention. Dr. Barkocy has numerous peer-reviewed presentations and publications on pediatric gait, including toe-walking.

Jodi Schilz, Ph.D
Jodi Schilz

Jodi Schilz
Assistant Professor

Jodi Schilz is a New Mexico native and alumni of UNM. She received a bachelor’s degree in Foreign Languages in 1999 and a bachelor’s in Microbiology/Chemistry in 2000 from UNM. She is an AmeriCorps (Colorado conservation Corps 2001) and Peace Corps (Tanzania, 2005-2007) alumni. She has a Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences/Neuroscience from Colorado State University in 2005 and recently competed her PhD in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Wyoming. She has done epilepsy, lung cancer/smokeless tobacco and environmental toxicology research. She is committed to STEM education and completed a one-year fellowship working with students and teachers around the state of Wyoming to integrate activity-based learning into the curriculum. She teaches evidence-based practice, pathophysiology, and pharmacology. She will be pursuing research interests including gait abnormalities, mitigation of environmental pollutants and therapies for metabolic disorder. Dr. Schilz has been involved with the motional analysis lab since hired in December 2014. She attended Clinical Gait Analysis: A Focus on Interpretation, level 1, in St. Paul, MN and participated in hands-on training with a PT from Shriner’s Hospital to perform clinical exams and 3D gait analysis interpretation. She has completed training's on how to acquire gait data using VICON Nexus and how to analyze and present data using Polygon and Report Generator. She is currently working on projects to look at gait in Parkinson’s patients.

Kathy Dieruf, P.T., Ph.D
Kathy Dieruf

Kathy Dieruf
Associate Professor

Kathy Dieruf, P.T., Ph.D., N.C.S., Graduated from UNM’s Physical Therapy Program in 1981. She received her advanced Master’s in Neurologic Physical Therapy from the Institute of Health Professions at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1988 and her doctorate in education from UNM in 1998. She is a certified specialist in the area of neurologic physical therapy.

Kathy teaches all of the adult neuro evaluation and treatment courses. She has an additional interest in gait and motion analysis. Kathy attended “Clinical Gait Assessment A Focus on Interpretation” Level I and Level II courses sponsored by Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare respectively. She spent time in the motion analysis laboratory at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, and the clinical and research laboratories at University of Southern California. Kathy is currently the Lab Manager for the Fred Rutan Gait and Motion Analysis Laboratory.

Victoria Garcia
Kathy Dieruf

Victoria Garcia
Motion Analysis Lab
Administrative Assistant

Victoria, the newest member of the Physical Therapy Department, performs a wide variety of administrative and faculty/staff support duties and assists with project and event planning. Victoria works directly with the Motion Analysis Lab preparing both clinical patients and research subjects for their motion analysis appointments. A native New Mexican, Victoria graduated from UNM with a BA in Psychology and minor in Sociology. Her foremost areas of interest are within developmental psychology, and personality formation. She is currently preparing to apply to the Anderson School of Management to attain a Master’s degree in Business Administration. In her spare time you can find Victoria traveling or teaching her Boston terrier “Lilly” new tricks.

Yuri Yoshida, P.T., PhD
Yuri Yoshida

Yuri Yoshida, P.T., PhD
Assistant Professor

Before coming to UNM, Dr. Yoshida completed her doctoral degree from the University of Delaware in Applied Anatomy and Biomechanics, and continued her postdoctoral training in motion analysis at the University of Utah. She has extensive experience in motion analysis systems, specifically the Vicon system, which is used at UNM. Dr. Yoshida's work has provided the medical and scientific communities with a deeper empirical understanding of biomechanics and muscle physiology regarding functional recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Dr. Yoshida biomechanically examined TKA physical therapy paradigms, her hypothesis focused specifically on the role of the quadriceps in functional recovery patterns. Dr. Yoshida found that, within the first year of recovery from the TKA procedure, patients demonstrated compensatory gait patterns by using hip extensor moments. In doing so, the patients decreased their use of the quadriceps muscle, inhibiting its recovery. Furthermore, Dr. Yoshida reported that these compensatory movement patterns might be related to a high risk for secondary osteoarthritis. Delving deeper into the impaired quadriceps function after TKA, Dr. Yoshida investigated how muscle physiology contributed to the abnormal gait patterns. Through the use of electromyography, she found that the abnormal muscle activities for both quadriceps and hamstrings were related to persistent quadriceps weakness.

Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation

MSC10 5600
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001

Phone: 505-272-2231 (clinic hotline) 505-272-4107 (academic office)
Fax: 505-272-8098